Category Archives: Time

The Three Losses in Five Years Syndrome

Over the past 10 years, I have come across a subset of individuals who begin a sudden onset of chronic disorganization. These are individuals who are serving as family caretakers who have experienced at least three significant losses in their life over the span of 5 years. This subset has usually served as primary caretaker for either parent(s), spouse or sibling(s). Many of them also serve as the executor of one or more of these estates. Many of these individuals seem to take about 7 to 12 years after the final loss to come to terms with this in their life.

What I would like to see is a more active approach to treating this, more on the onset prevention than as an after effect treatment.

It would be beneficial to have physicians and their staffs work to identify caretakers who are already at two losses in five years, and encourage them to get additional support through grief counseling, caretaker support group participation and for those financially able, consider the services of a skilled professional organizer. A skilled professional organizer can do wonders to help the “primary caretaker client ” in terms of time management, goal setting, project planning and management. Many professional organizers can help establish bill paying and document management systems to handle the growing paperwork that complex and long-term medical conditions usually entail as well as documents for estates probate. A professional organizer can help the client simplify his or her life and environment as well as serve as a body double for difficult and often procrastinated tasks.

While a professional organizers services are not inexpensive, they are a valuable tool that may help the primary caretaker live a more vibrant and fulfilling life while and after experiencing heavy losses in their life.

The Three Losses in 5 Years are primarily death losses. For some, however, one of those losses can be the loss of a pet, divorce or significant job loss.

I believe more research and education is needed in this area. Let’s hope that this syndrome can be more clearly understood and helpful strategies for success developed and promoted to the general public.

 

This is a best of post

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under Caregiving, Client Management Strategies, Communication, Communication Strategies, Knowledge, Organizing, Philosophy, Productivity, Techniques, Terms, Thinking, Time

Resolutions

It is almost the official time of year when we work on setting resolutions.

Here is an easy way to get started on your resolutions for 2013. What can you do more of in 2013? What can you do less of?

The More

Smile More
Laugh More
Walk More
Drink More Water
Appreciate More
Read More
Write More
Listen More

The Less

Eat Less
Swear Less
Worry Less
Frown Less
Complain Less
Procrastinate Less
Talk Less

Do you want to make more progress in 2013? It may be a perfect time to start working with a transition coach to help you get more from your life in 2013.

Leave a comment

Filed under Creativity, Goal Setting, Productivity, Time

Seasonal Slowdown

There are certain times of year that seem to reduce our daily productivity. In my opinion there are four big times. They are the late November and the traditional December Holidays, early July and the first two weeks of August.

Don’t let others make you slow. Accept that this is going to be a less productive time when especially when working with colleagues.   Let their delay and dallying be your occasion to work on past and future projects. These times are great for working on organization of past material, future planning, back burner projects and future planning.

This is the perfect time to use my “project hand” to list out the projects that are perfect for the next seasonal delay time.

You may also want to check out my website for monthly tips on organizing ideas for home and work.

Leave a comment

Filed under Business Marketing Strategies, Client Management Strategies, Creativity, Goal Setting, Organizing, Productivity, Time

Three Losses in Five Years

The Three Losses in 5 years Syndrome

Over the past 10 years, I have come across a subset of individuals who begin a sudden onset of chronic disorganization.  These are individuals who are  serving as family caretakers who have experienced at least three significant losses in their life over the span of 5 years. This subset has usually served as primary caretaker for either parent(s), spouse or sibling(s). Many of them also serve as the executor of one or more of these estates.   Many of these individuals seem to take about 7 to 12 years after the final loss  to come to terms with this in their life.

What I would like to see is a more active approach to treating this,  more on the onset prevention than as an after effect treatment.

It would be beneficial to have physicians and their staffs work to identify caretakers who are already at two losses in five years, and encourage them to get additional support through grief counseling, caretaker support group participation and for those financially able,  consider the services of a skilled professional organizer.  A skilled professional organizer can do wonders to help the “primary caretaker client ” in terms of time management, goal setting, project planning and management. Many professional organizers can help establish bill paying and document management systems to handle the growing paperwork that complex and long-term medical conditions usually entail as well as documents for estates probate.  A professional organizer can help the client simplify his or her life and environment as well as serve as a body double for difficult and often procrastinated tasks.

While a professional organizers services are not inexpensive, they are a valuable tool that may help the primary caretaker live a more vibrant and fulfilling life while and after experiencing heavy losses in their life.

The Three Losses in 5 Years are primarily death losses.  For some, however, one of those losses can be the loss of a pet, divorce or significant job loss.

I believe more research and education is needed in this area. Let’s hope that this syndrome can be more clearly understood and helpful strategies for success developed and promoted to the general public.

 

This is a best of post from 2010.

2 Comments

Filed under Caregiving, Client Management Strategies, Communication Strategies, Knowledge, Organizing, Productivity, Terms, Thinking, Time

Rushing – All in Your Mind?

Last week I covered the physical reasons for rushing – now I want to cover the other causes of rushing a project or activity, along with some preventive strategies.

We tend to start rushing if we find we were spending too much time in our “head”  concentrating on something else and need to catch up. The key here is to first acknowledge that you have been unavailable and then secondly work out a schedule to complete your task safety and productively.

The second reason for rushing can also be caused by allowing ourselves to  follow the pace of others. This can be dangerous and have less effective results. Again the key is to first acknowledge that you are “doing this”. You might identify the “doing of this” by observing your talking speed or your walking pace. If you find yourself speeding up your voice pace or copying the walking or movement pace of your client or co-worker you have likely caught their rushing bug. After observing and identifying your case of rushing, it is time to take a deep breath and physically slow your pace down. A short five-minute water break might be in order to help you go back to the more normal calmer state of your being. Your client will likely be able to use the break to slow themselves down.

Rushing is a way to create problems for yourself, your company or client. By being aware and understanding how rushing can affect you or your client,  you can consciously work to avoid it. This will allow you to create a more productive,  safer and calmer working relationship and working environment.

Link to earlier Stop Rushing post.

This is a best of post from 2010.

Leave a comment

Filed under Client Management Strategies, Communication, Communication Strategies, Knowledge, Organizing, Philosophy, Productivity, Terms, Time

Time to Stop Rushing Around

Rushing (going faster than necessary) can lead to accidents, misunderstanding and problems.  By thinking then proceeding at a good and steady pace we can reach our destination or project objective safely and productively. This takes continuous practice and the understanding of what the components of rushing actually are for us. There is physical rushing and mental rushing. Today we will focus on the causes of physical rushing. To prevent physical rushing, we first need to understand why it occurs.

When We Cause The Problem

Rushing occurs when:

  • We haven’t preplanned our projects.
  • We have more on our plate than we originally anticipated.
  • We have lost track of time and have to catch up.
  • We become ill or have an unexpected family emergency.

When Others Cause The Problem

We can also be in a rushed state because of other people. Some examples are:

  • Others who have not fulfilled their part of the project
  • Others who fail to show up ready or on time
  • Others who become ill or have a family emergency

Other Causes of Rushing

We can also be rushing because:

  • The supplies or material have not arrived. This could be due to weather, transportation issues or even paperwork delays.
  • The supplies delivered are wrong or damaged.
  • Something broke unexpectedly and now a delay has set in.

By understanding the causes of physical rushing, and being aware of the potential signals, we can develop strategies to prevent, avoid or timetable some “extra” time in our plan to account for these potential problems.  By making adjustments to our initial timetable or along the way we can complete our projects safely.

This is a best of post of 2010.

2 Comments

Filed under Client Management Strategies, Communication Strategies, Goal Setting, Knowledge, Philosophy, Technology, Terms, Thinking, Time

Look at the Done’s In Your Life

Are you in need of some encouragement or motivation for yourself or your client? Take a few moments to look at some of the accomplishments you have made from the time you were born. Everyone has done some great things. If you are finding your list short or boring, you may want to examine your “done’s” from a different perspective.  Sometimes perseverance and tenacity are the characteristic strengths to celebrate. Here are a few key words to get you or your client’s thinking in this direction.

I have Finished

Example – high school, completed online course, read Bleak House

I have Progressed

Example – got a job after college, received advancement in company, went from board member- at- large to president of organization

I Survived

Example – lived in a house undergoing remodel for one year, sustained working for world’s most difficult boss for a year in my twenties,  managed three-hour daily commute for 18 months

I Maintained

Example – I maintained a full-time job while raising 3 children, I maintained my attendance at exercise class for two years, I maintained reading at least 3 books a month for the past year

I Stopped

Example – declined to utilize local poor quality dry cleaners after receiving bad service, changed physician due to ongoing appointment inconvenience issues

Once you have done this insightful exercise you may find it helpful to start an accomplishment or achievement journal. You may also want to read my earlier blog on Looking at the Un’s in Life.

1 Comment

Filed under Client Management Strategies, Goal Setting, Knowledge, Productivity, Terms, Thinking, Time