Category Archives: Communication Strategies

The Three Losses in Five Years Syndrome

Over the past 10 years, I have come across a subset of individuals who begin a sudden onset of chronic disorganization. These are individuals who are serving as family caretakers who have experienced at least three significant losses in their life over the span of 5 years. This subset has usually served as primary caretaker for either parent(s), spouse or sibling(s). Many of them also serve as the executor of one or more of these estates. Many of these individuals seem to take about 7 to 12 years after the final loss to come to terms with this in their life.

What I would like to see is a more active approach to treating this, more on the onset prevention than as an after effect treatment.

It would be beneficial to have physicians and their staffs work to identify caretakers who are already at two losses in five years, and encourage them to get additional support through grief counseling, caretaker support group participation and for those financially able, consider the services of a skilled professional organizer. A skilled professional organizer can do wonders to help the “primary caretaker client ” in terms of time management, goal setting, project planning and management. Many professional organizers can help establish bill paying and document management systems to handle the growing paperwork that complex and long-term medical conditions usually entail as well as documents for estates probate. A professional organizer can help the client simplify his or her life and environment as well as serve as a body double for difficult and often procrastinated tasks.

While a professional organizers services are not inexpensive, they are a valuable tool that may help the primary caretaker live a more vibrant and fulfilling life while and after experiencing heavy losses in their life.

The Three Losses in 5 Years are primarily death losses. For some, however, one of those losses can be the loss of a pet, divorce or significant job loss.

I believe more research and education is needed in this area. Let’s hope that this syndrome can be more clearly understood and helpful strategies for success developed and promoted to the general public.

 

This is a best of post

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Filed under Caregiving, Client Management Strategies, Communication, Communication Strategies, Knowledge, Organizing, Philosophy, Productivity, Techniques, Terms, Thinking, Time

Time for Kudos

Kudos means a praising remark. We all like to be appreciated and acknowledged for our work or contributions. Let’s spend some time exploring kudos.

Why Give Kudos

There are a few reasons to give kudos. First, we all like to be acknowledged and appreciated. Second, appreciating someone’s work or efforts can sometimes be the catalyst to develop or deepen a new or existing personal or work relationship. Third, kudos are sometimes the sustaining embers in people’s lives.

How to Give Kudos

Kudos can be verbal or written. Kudos can be physically given as in a handwritten note, card or with a small token gift. Kudos can also be given via an email or on a blog posting can be made from time to time.

Receiving Kudos

It is nice to receive kudos. Kudos can be put up on a bulletin board or display shelf. Verbal kudos can be transformed to penned lines and inserted into an appreciation journal.

Appreciating the Giver of the Kudos

It is polite to acknowledge the sender for their sentiments or gifts, either by verbalizing your appreciation or by sending an acknowledging note.

Making Kudos Part of Your Routine

Take time to routinely reflect and send appropriate kudos to those around you. Kudos giving can be a nice break in a full or busy week. Kudos giving makes us look outside of ourselves, which can be helpful when we are too inward thinking.

Who can you give kudos to in your life?

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Filed under Client Management Strategies, Communication, Communication Strategies, Philosophy, Terms, Thinking

The Power of The Pause

The Pause. Generally, not celebrated. Generally ignored, but incredibly powerful. The pause has power. The power to make someone think, re-frame, process and comprehend. Not pausing contributes to less than successful communications as well as negotiations.

Sometimes pausing for just a few seconds can seem like a million minutes. It is the uncomfortable silence that can deliver us to a new level of communications. Learning to pause takes patience and courage.

This is a best of post

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Filed under Client Management Strategies, Communication Strategies, Knowledge, Productivity, Terms

Make Time for Kudos

Kudos means a praising remark.  We all like to be appreciated and acknowledged for our work or contributions.  Let’s spend some time exploring kudos.

Why Give Kudos

There are a few reasons to give kudos. First, we all like to be acknowledged and appreciated. Second, appreciating someone’s work or efforts can sometimes be the catalyst to develop or deepen a new or existing personal or work relationship. Third, kudos are sometimes the sustaining embers in people’s lives.

How to Give Kudos

Kudos can be verbal or written. Kudos  can be physically given as in a handwritten note, card or with a small token gift.  Kudos can also be given via an email or on a blog posting can be made from time to time.

Receiving Kudos

It is nice to receive kudos. Kudos can be put up on a bulletin board or display shelf. Verbal kudos can be transformed to penned lines and  inserted into an appreciation journal.

Appreciating the Giver of the  Kudos

It is polite to acknowledge the sender for their sentiments or gifts, either by verbalizing your appreciation or by sending an acknowledging note.

Making Kudos Part of Your Routine

Take time to routinely reflect and send appropriate kudos to those around you. Kudos giving can be a nice break in a full or busy week.  Kudos giving makes us look outside of ourselves, which can be helpful when we are too inward thinking.

Who can you give kudos to in your life?

Leave a comment

Filed under Client Management Strategies, Communication, Communication Strategies, Philosophy, Terms, Thinking

The Back of The Napkin – Book Review

Dan Roam’s book The Back of The Napkin: Solving Problems and Selling Ideas with Pictures  (2008) presents a methodology for creating visual graphic presentations. If you want to get your point across visually then this may be a helpful ongoing reference book. The SQVID concept once clearly explained and displayed in the center portion of the book is a great tool. Roam also uses the 6 W’s (reminiscent of the old print media strategies in writing a story) to help you create a usable visual for your presentation.  This book while seemingly an easy read, is not necessarily easy to grasp in just one session.  It can serve as a useful reference text when you are creating a presentation to sell your ideas or solve a problem. Don’t skip the appendix, it also has some interesting and helpful sections.

Dan now runs The Napkin Academy. I suggest reviewing this website before and after reading The Back of The Napkin  to help the concepts sink in. If SQVID has you curious, check out his link here.

If you enjoyed this book review – here are a few others:

Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us

Quiet: The Power of Introverts

Six Thinking Hats

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Filed under Books to Read, Business Marketing Strategies, Client Management Strategies, Communication Strategies, Creativity, Knowledge, Productivity

Three Losses in Five Years

The Three Losses in 5 years Syndrome

Over the past 10 years, I have come across a subset of individuals who begin a sudden onset of chronic disorganization.  These are individuals who are  serving as family caretakers who have experienced at least three significant losses in their life over the span of 5 years. This subset has usually served as primary caretaker for either parent(s), spouse or sibling(s). Many of them also serve as the executor of one or more of these estates.   Many of these individuals seem to take about 7 to 12 years after the final loss  to come to terms with this in their life.

What I would like to see is a more active approach to treating this,  more on the onset prevention than as an after effect treatment.

It would be beneficial to have physicians and their staffs work to identify caretakers who are already at two losses in five years, and encourage them to get additional support through grief counseling, caretaker support group participation and for those financially able,  consider the services of a skilled professional organizer.  A skilled professional organizer can do wonders to help the “primary caretaker client ” in terms of time management, goal setting, project planning and management. Many professional organizers can help establish bill paying and document management systems to handle the growing paperwork that complex and long-term medical conditions usually entail as well as documents for estates probate.  A professional organizer can help the client simplify his or her life and environment as well as serve as a body double for difficult and often procrastinated tasks.

While a professional organizers services are not inexpensive, they are a valuable tool that may help the primary caretaker live a more vibrant and fulfilling life while and after experiencing heavy losses in their life.

The Three Losses in 5 Years are primarily death losses.  For some, however, one of those losses can be the loss of a pet, divorce or significant job loss.

I believe more research and education is needed in this area. Let’s hope that this syndrome can be more clearly understood and helpful strategies for success developed and promoted to the general public.

 

This is a best of post from 2010.

2 Comments

Filed under Caregiving, Client Management Strategies, Communication Strategies, Knowledge, Organizing, Productivity, Terms, Thinking, Time

Rushing – All in Your Mind?

Last week I covered the physical reasons for rushing – now I want to cover the other causes of rushing a project or activity, along with some preventive strategies.

We tend to start rushing if we find we were spending too much time in our “head”  concentrating on something else and need to catch up. The key here is to first acknowledge that you have been unavailable and then secondly work out a schedule to complete your task safety and productively.

The second reason for rushing can also be caused by allowing ourselves to  follow the pace of others. This can be dangerous and have less effective results. Again the key is to first acknowledge that you are “doing this”. You might identify the “doing of this” by observing your talking speed or your walking pace. If you find yourself speeding up your voice pace or copying the walking or movement pace of your client or co-worker you have likely caught their rushing bug. After observing and identifying your case of rushing, it is time to take a deep breath and physically slow your pace down. A short five-minute water break might be in order to help you go back to the more normal calmer state of your being. Your client will likely be able to use the break to slow themselves down.

Rushing is a way to create problems for yourself, your company or client. By being aware and understanding how rushing can affect you or your client,  you can consciously work to avoid it. This will allow you to create a more productive,  safer and calmer working relationship and working environment.

Link to earlier Stop Rushing post.

This is a best of post from 2010.

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Filed under Client Management Strategies, Communication, Communication Strategies, Knowledge, Organizing, Philosophy, Productivity, Terms, Time